Tips for Raising a Puppy

  • When you arrive home do not immediately go out to greet your pup or make a big deal about your arrival. A pup and even mature dogs should be ignored for the first 10 mins at least after your arrival home so they do not spend many hours anticipating a dramatic arrival home from their owner. This is a common mistake as people feel “guilty” for leaving their animals at home alone.

  • Likewise when you leave the home you should not make a fuss of the pup saying goodbye or let the pup identify you are leaving. You should always leave the house as if you are only going to the letterbox and will be back in 30 secs.
  • Ensure your pup has lots of toys that they can chew. The more toys they have the less likely they are to get bored with them and seek other goodies to chew – namely shoes or furniture! If you do find them with something you don’t want them to have, replace it with a toy they are allowed.
  • If your pup is being destructive whilst you are away from the home try and identify what time of day the destruction is happening. It is unlikely that a pup will go at it all day, but more likely to be when the owners leave or the pup anticipates the owners returning home.

  • Music or radio left playing (particularly classical music) can help calm the environment for the pup.
  • Always feed your dog after you have eaten. With puppies this is often not feasible but ensuring you work toward that regime as the dog matures will ensure the same result.
  • Make sure the pup is calm before feeding – even making the pup “sit” or “stand” before giving them their food will ensure they receive their food in a calm manner.
  • Dogs and puppies must have daily exercise – depending on the age of course depends on the extent of the exercise ie a young pup will use up enough energy playing in the backyard for the first 3-4 months.
  • If you are unable to walk your dog on a particular day then spend that time teaching the dog a new trick, command or playing with it in some other way.
  • When playing with your dog make should YOU end the game.
  • Don’t lock puppy away when people come to the house, allow it to meet them to learn that strangers won’t hurt the him/her. Ask your visitors to ignore the pup on initial introduction, allowing the pup to sniff the visitor. The puppy will soon realise that there is no danger and they will be seeking the attention of the visitor in no time at all!
  • When walking your puppy on the lead do not let the pup pull you. If pup does then immediately stop walking and turn in the opposite direction. This will teach the pup to keep an eye on you and that walking alongside you is where you want it to be not pulling you down the road – this will certainly end up a much bigger issue when the dog matures and weighs 35 kg!
  • Do not react or fuss when thunder, lightening or fireworks occurs. If you are calm the pup will see that there is no reason or need to be afraid.